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SMU CEO SERIES SEMINAR



On 24th January 2019, Training Vision Institute’s founder and CEO David Kwee was invited to the Singapore Management University (SMU) to give a talk to a group of undergraduates as part of a CEO Series seminar. He spoke about the role of education and the importance of being adaptable to the changes occurring in today’s economy.

Mr David Kwee painted a picture of the 21st century economy as one that values intangible assets over tangible assets. Intangible assets were described as values and skills driven by talent, such as intellect, innovation, teamwork and others. He mentioned that the ability to create intangible assets will count towards the valuation of companies in the future.

Referring to a quote by Business Guru Peter Drucker that reads “people represent one of the last reliable sources of competitive advantage”, Mr David Kwee drove the point that human capital paves the way for the new economy, as tangible capital is subject to obsolescence.

He suggested that people build on “Intangible free space”, where talent drives ideas and innovation, instead of being confined to fixed roles. Opportunities, he said, come from human ingenuity and not from rigid management structures.

He introduced the idea of a T-shaped professional- a person with broad yet deep understanding of multiple disciplines and systems. He also introduced the I-shaped professional, with the same breadth and depth of understanding, but grounded in identity, insight, inclusion, institutionalisation, and integration.

As the economy changes, the way that people learn must also change. Mr David Kwee praised technology and the advent of online education, and mentioned that online blended learning will mark the way people learn in the future. He shared his belief that in the future, technology would drive education models.

He urged the room of undergraduates to engage in bite-sized learning and to make use of the limited time they have to pick up valuable skills not taught in school. We hope the young, ambitious undergraduates from SMU took away valuable learning points from the seminar.